Author New Zealand Sea Adventures

New Zealand Sea Adventures was established in 1990 by Tony Howell in Titahi Bay. From that beginning the NZ Sea Adventures name grew and became the leading PADI scuba diving training facility in Wellington. On the 12th of October 2000 NZ Sea Adventures was awarded the Wellington Regions only PADI 5 Star Instructor Development Centre rating. After 14 years the NZSA shop was moved out to Kilbirnie where it remained for four years. In 2008 we moved back home to Mana in Porirua. Here we have continued training excellent Scuba Divers, supplying the best dive equipment available and much much more. Having our own on-site dive pool certainly helps.

Freediving and Scuba Diving wetsuits, what are the differences?

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Wetsuit Neoprene is a rubber foam used to make, well, a wetsuit. It is called closed-cell neoprene as the bubbles are trapped in the neoprene rubber foam and between one or more layers of fabric. Closed-cell means that each nitrogen bubble is surrounded and separated by neoprene. Both freediving and scuba suits are made of closed-cell neoprene. The freediving neoprene (sometimes called open-cell) is a low or medium density neoprene meaning the bubbles are larger and the walls between the bubbles are thinner than in a scuba wetsuit. The result is the suit stretches more, is softer, and very comfortable…

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Project AWARE Evening at NZ Sea Adventures

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Join the Team at NZ Sea Adventures for a FREE Project AWARE Specialty evening on the 12th of October.  All divers and curious Non-divers are welcome with an optional certification counting towards a PADI Master Scuba Diver rating for just $55. Project AWARE were originally formed in 1989 as an environmental initiative by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI). Project AWARE existed to increase environmental awareness through diver education. In 1992, with tremendous support from the dive community, Project AWARE Foundation was registered as an independent 501(c)3 nonprofit organization in the U.S. To engage divers and activists around  the world…

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Deciding on a Scuba Diving Regulator Set-Up

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Deciding on a Regulator setup to go for first off can be all a little bewildering, will you get what you pay for spending a little extra?  Does the cheap regulator actually work?  What is a ventury or balanced regulator even mean?  One things for sure and that we can assure you is that they supply with that all important air while underwater, but…. Since the underwater demand valve was introduced to recreational scuba diving in the 20th century, there have been many advancements on performance and features one top of the introduction of a downstream valve.  Still confused?  Now…

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The Wonders of Drysuit Diving

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Drysuits are heavy, uncomfortable, expensive and difficult to operate… Said somebody at some stage but have you ever dived one? Yes they do cost more than Wetsuits but will out-perform any wetsuit on any given day in all temperate diving conditions. They are convenient in that you don’t need to dry off afterwards and don’t get the wind chill against your wet body. To most who have made the wise transition find they are a complete wonder and look back on their wetsuit diving days in complete disarray! Convenience Imagine being completely dry at the end of every dive.. For…

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The Value of Continuing Education for Scuba Divers

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Modern technology and advancements in scuba diver training have seen many a scuba diver certified with the minimum of time and effort.  In as little as four days, you can become a certified PADI Open Water Diver!  This is great news for people looking to take up the sport and get out diving with their buddies but…do they have all the knowledge and experience to be safe and confident in the mix of underwater environments out there?  Do you know how things really work?  Could you help a diver in distress? Have you ever dived an underwater shipwreck? With enough…

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Choosing The Right Scuba Diving Fins For You?

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With the variety of fin types, styles and material used it’s sometimes a little confusing when trying to decide on the right diving fins for your activity.  Will they do what I need them to do properly, do they fit, what’s a split or blade fin, open heel or full foot.  What fin’s do or will your dive buddies have? Firstly choose a reputable and established dive store like New Zealand Sea Adventures, this way you’ll know their products are chosen with the divers best interests in mind.  They will have the experience to know what works for every individual…

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KISS Classic CCR – Syntactic Foam Test Results

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In a previous copy of Dive New Zealand magazine, I told you that the first KISS Classic rebreather with a syntactic coated canister had arrived in New Zealand. I can now tell you how this innovation will save you money and extend your time underwater. At least three divers have already converted their KISS Classic rebreathers to syntactic canisters to gain these advantages. OK, what are we talking about here? To understand why syntactic foam is so exciting, let’s look at how a rebreather CO2 scrubber works. Probably the most common scrubber material in New Zealand is Sofnolime 797. These granules comprise calcium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide and water. When these…

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Dive Crew News and Employment Opportunity

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Well done and welcome to those new divers who completed their Open Water Diver course during October and two new Drysuit divers. It’s all about core Scuba Diver courses this month with Open Water Diver, Advanced Open Water and PADI Rescue Diver courses. If you’ve not got these three essential diving qualifications then join in on the fun. Get stuck into some specialties for your Master Scuba Diver rating. For those a little further ahead and looking for employment, we have a position available so make yourself known.  Divemaster courses are getting a lot of interest, so now is the time to…

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Benefits of a Rebreather

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Warm & moist air: This is due to the chemical reaction of the carbon dioxide being removed from the gas in the loop by the scrubber material. The by-product of this action is heat and moisture. This helps the diver to stay warmer and hydrated longer. The gas a diver breathes from an open circuit (SCUBA) cylinder is “refrigerated” and will drop the diver’s core body temperature quickly. Time: 2 to 3 hours of gas. With open circuit, the diver inhales the breathing gas and exhales what they do not use into the water column. With a CCR, the diver…

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Beginner diving tips to avoid danger

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Safety is almost always at the forefront of any divers thinking, but occasionally and commonly even the most experienced and qualified enthusiasts find themselves in an uncomfortable situation.  The inevitable will come for every diver when a little surprise catches them off guard and they need to re-group a little to regain control of the dive.  For the most part, in an ideal world, this is all any diver would really want or expect to happen. Be a S.A.F.E. Diver and Slowly Ascend from Every Dive. Keeping an eye on air consumption is an absolute must.  New Open Water Diver…

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