Author Louisa McKerrow

Louisa is the Communications Manager for WWF-New Zealand (World Wide Fund for Nature). She has extensive experience in the areas of media, communications and public relations. Her pen, camera and sense of humour have led her to wonderful work locations throughout Australia, Canada, USA, Solomon Islands, Vietnam, Cambodia, New Zealand and Peru. She was raised on a sheep and cattle farm in Outback Australia. Her specialty sectors are the environment (forest/marine/species conservation and climate change), crisis communications (biosecurity, floods and cyclones), and agriculture (livestock and broad-acre farming). She is an Open Water-accredited diver and has explored underwater ecosystems in the Solomon Islands and Cambodia.

Zero Carbon Act campaigners welcome Environment Commissioner’s endorsement

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Generation Zero, WWF New Zealand, and Forest & Bird, are welcoming the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment’s endorsement of a Zero Carbon Act for New Zealand, which aligns very closely with the Zero Carbon Act proposal launched by Generation Zero in April 2017. Commissioner Simon Upton released the report ‘A Zero Carbon Act for New Zealand’ today, in support for the establishment of a climate law containing the key elements of the UK’s 2008 Climate Change Act. Generation Zero’s Zero Carbon Act proposal is based on the same UK law and shares these key elements – adapted to account for…

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Deep concerns with suggestion to “scrap” fishing electronic monitoring

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Environmental organisation WWF-New Zealand is deeply concerned by suggestions from the new Fisheries Minister Stuart Nash that he might “scrap” plans to put cameras on fishing boats. The previous government committed to a roll out of electronic monitoring with cameras on fishing boats in July 2017. Late last year, Minister Nash delayed the roll out of these cameras onto fishing boats by at least six months to sometime after October 2018. Today, the Minister is suggesting that completely cancelling the camera monitoring program is now an option. In response, WWF-New Zealand CEO Livia Esterhazy said: “Putting cameras on boats would…

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World Rowing becomes first sporting body to pledge to protect World Heritage sites

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Before the next Olympic Games begin in South Korea, the world’s oldest international sports federation, World Rowing (FISA) has become the first sporting body to pledge to protect World Heritage sites and their buffer zones. Environmental organisation WWF-New Zealand is supporting the announcement as an opportunity to showcase New Zealand rowing excellence and highlight the value of NZ’s UNESCO World Heritage sites – the Sub-Antarctic Islands, Te Wahipounamu and Tongariro National Park. WWF welcomes this landmark commitment and calls for other sports bodies to follow World Rowing’s lead. By ensuring its events and rowing activities under its control will not…

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Government urged to stand strong against fishing lobbyists and protect public rights

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Environmental organisation WWF-New Zealand is pleased to hear that Fisheries Minister Stuart Nash is committed to enabling transparency and trust in our fisheries management system. WWF agrees that it is vital to protect public access to information about commercial fishing through the Integrated Electronic Monitoring and Reporting System (IEMRS). The release of the New Zealand fishing industry letter this week has sparked an important debate about public rights to know how our ocean resources are used and managed. “It’s great to hear that the government intends to stand strong and defend some basic public rights and laws,” said WWF-New Zealand…

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New Blockchain Project has Potential to Revolutionise Seafood Industry

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Environmental organisation WWF and its partners have introduced revolutionary blockchain technology to the Pacific Islands’ tuna industry, the first of its kind for this region, to help stamp out illegal fishing and human rights abuses. Tracking fish from vessel to the supermarket, the Blockchain Supply Chain Traceability Project is using digital technology in the fresh and frozen tuna sectors of the Western and Central Pacific region to strengthen supply chain management. As part of an innovative initiative, WWF-New Zealand, WWF-Australia, and WWF-Fiji have teamed up with global tech innovator ConsenSys, information and communications technology (ICT) implementer TraSeable, and tuna fishing…

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Government allows new seismic blasting in Māui dolphin habitat

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Environmental organisation WWF-New Zealand says that the New Zealand government is failing to protect the last 63 Māui dolphins by allocating oil and gas exploration rights within Māui dolphin habitat off Taranaki. The Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment today announced that it is handing out a 12-year oil and gas exploration permit for 547km2 of ocean within the known range of our critically endangered Māui dolphins. “Allocating oil exploration rights in the Māui dolphin habitat is just irresponsible. Only around 63 Māui dolphins survive today and the seismic blasting used in oil exploration is known to affect whales and…

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New squid plan a step towards protection for New Zealand sea lions

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Environmental organisation WWF-New Zealand cautiously welcomes the new southern squid fishing plan (the ‘SQU6T Operational Plan’) released by Minister for Fisheries Stuart Nash today as a first step towards protecting New Zealand sea lions. “The New Zealand sea lion is the rarest sea lion in the world, and fishing is the biggest threat to these endangered marine mammals,” said WWF-New Zealand CEO Livia Esterhazy. “This new squid fishing plan reduced the kill limit for sea lions from 68 to 38. This is a first step towards ensuring these precious animals’ survival, but the progress cannot stop here. The latest science…

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WWF-New Zealand Excited to Announce 2017 Conservation Innovation Award Winner

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Out of a record-breaking 47 entries, the three winning ideas of WWF-New Zealand’s 2017 Conservation Innovation Awards, announced tonight are: a high-tech thermal imaging solution for invasive species’ management; a device that detects real-time E. coli contamination in freshwater; and an innovation that combines thermal imaging and artificial intelligence for a predator free New Zealand. The Kiwi winners will each be awarded a $25,000 grant to fast-track their ideas from concept to development, to maximize impact for conservation, making a real difference in the fight to protect precious ecosystems and native species. “We’re thrilled to announce our amazing 2017 winners,”…

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Conservation Innovation Winner Set to Revolutionise E-coli Freshwater Management

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The real risk of E. coli freshwater contamination is under the New Zealand spotlight, and now there’s a new game-changer solution on the way to revolutionise how Kiwis can take action in the national freshwater emergency. Announced yesterday, 2017 WWF-New Zealand Conservation Innovation Award winner, Water Action Initiative New Zealand (WAI NZ) is developing a real-time water-borne E. coli contamination sensor that will give community members, regional councils and government a tool to monitor freshwater in real-time, providing immediate detection of increased E.coli levels so that swifter action, including early health warnings, can be taken. WAI NZ received a $25,000…

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NZ Sea Lion Research Shows More Action Needed to Address Fishing Threat

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New research shows that more action is needed to reduce accidental catch of endangered New Zealand sea lions in fishing nets, said environmental organsiation WWF-New Zealand. NZ sea lions/rāpoka are the most severely threatened and rarest sea lion in the world. They are listed as ‘nationally critical’ by the Department of Conservation, and without further action this species is at risk of extinction. The research, undertaken by a team of scientists from the University of Otago, Massey University and the University of Toronto, and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America…

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